Are you 25 or over?

Are you 25 or over?

If you are a worker aged 25 and over, and not in your first year of an apprenticeship, you are legally entitled to at least the National Living Wage of £7.83 per hour.

Think you are being underpaid? Register a confidential complaint with HMRC. Your details will not be shared with your employer.

Not sure what your current hourly rate is? Use our calculator to check.

It is illegal for your employer to pay you below the National Living Wage, so check your pay and talk to your manager to make sure you’re getting what you are entitled to.

Feel uncomfortable talking to your manager? Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice and support.

If you’re an employer, by law you must pay workers aged 25 and over the legal National Living Wage. Find out more.

Are you under 25?

Are you under 25?

If you are a worker aged under 25, or an apprentice, you are legally entitled to at least the National Minimum Wage.

Think you are being underpaid? Register a confidential complaint with HMRC. Your details will not be shared with your employer.

Not sure what your current hourly rate is? Use our calculator to check.

 

Date 25 & over 21 to 24 18 to 20 Under 18 Apprentice
1 April 2017 £7.50 £7.05 £5.60 £4.05 £3.50
From 1 April 2018 £7.83 £7.38 £5.90 £4.20 £3.70

 

It is illegal for your employer to pay you less than the National Minimum Wage, so check your pay and talk to your manager to make sure you’re getting what you are entitled to.

Feel uncomfortable talking to your manager? Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice and support.

If you’re an employer, by law you must pay workers under 25 at least the legal National Minimum Wage. Find out more.

Are you an apprentice?

Are you an apprentice?

If you are in your first year of your apprenticeship then you are legally entitled to at least the apprenticeship National Minimum Wage of £3.70 per hour.

If you are aged 19 or over and have completed the first year of your apprenticeship, then you are legally entitled to at least the National Minimum and Living Wage rates relevant to your age group.

Think you are being underpaid? Register a confidential complaint with HMRC. Your details will not be shared with your employer.

Not sure what your current hourly rate is? Use our calculator to check.

 

Date 25 & over

and completed the first year of your apprenticeship

21 to 24

and completed the first year of your apprenticeship

19 to 20

and completed the first year of your apprenticeship

Apprentice

In the first year of your apprenticeship or under 19

1 April 2017 £7.50 £7.05 £5.60 £3.50
From 1 April 2018 £7.83 £7.38 £5.90 £3.70

 

It is illegal for your employer to pay you less than the National Minimum Wage rates.

So check your pay and talk to your manager to make sure you’re getting what you are legally entitled to.

Feel uncomfortable talking to your manager? Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice and support.

 

Is your employer paying you properly?

Is your employer paying you properly?

Think you might be underpaid? Register a confidential complaint with HMRC. Some of the most common payment mistakes are listed below.

Check whether any of these common payment mistakes could apply to you and make sure you’re not missing out. If you’re being underpaid, talk to your manager. If your employer owes you back pay, make sure you get what you’re owed. You can also call the Acas helpline for confidential advice on 0300 123 1100.

If you receive tips at work, they cannot legally count towards your National Minimum or Living Wage. If tips are counted as part of your pay, and you rely on them to bring your pay up to the National Minimum or Living Wage, then you could be underpaid and not receiving what you are legally owed.

Think you might be underpaid? Your employer could owe you back pay. Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice on 0300 123 1100 or register a complaint with HMRC.

If you get a higher hourly rate for overtime or working anti-social hours, and paid below the National Minimum or Living Wage for your regular shifts, then you could be underpaid and not receiving what you are legally owed.

Think you might be underpaid? Your employer could owe you back pay. Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice on 0300 123 1100 or register a complaint with HMRC.

If your employer has deducted your wages to cover the cost of items connected with your job such as uniform, safety clothing, specified work wear or tools etc. then you may have been underpaid. Deductions for items connected with the job must not take you below the National Minimum or Living Wage for any given pay period.

Think you might be underpaid? Your employer could owe you back pay. Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice on 0300 123 1100 or register a complaint with HMRC.

If your work involves travel between different assignments, and your employer doesn’t pay you for that time, you might not be getting all that you’re owed. Additionally, if your work does not cover the cost of travelling between different assignments, then you could be underpaid and not receiving what you are legally owed.

Think you might be underpaid? Your employer could owe you back pay. Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice on 0300 123 1100 or register a complaint with HMRC.

If you work a little unpaid extra time on a regular basis, such as helping to open up shop or having to wait in the workplace before you can go home after your shift, then you could be underpaid. Additionally, if you have not been paid for time spent training or whilst on a trial period you may also have been underpaid. If you do this regularly, this unpaid time can quickly add up and you might find that you are missing out on your National Minimum or Living Wage.

Think you might be underpaid? Your employer could owe you back pay. Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice on 0300 123 1100 or register a complaint with HMRC.

Your age affects the rate you should be paid on the National Minimum or Living Wage. If your employer didn’t review your pay on your birthday and was slow to make any adjustments, you might not have got all the pay that you’re owed.

These are the current rates as well as the rates that will apply from 1 April 2018.

 

Date 25 & over 21 to 24 18 to 20 Under 18 Apprentice
1 April 2017 £7.50 £7.05 £5.60 £4.05 £3.50
From 1 April 2018 £7.83 £7.38 £5.90 £4.20 £3.70

 

Think you might be underpaid? Your employer could owe you back pay. Call the Acas helpline for confidential advice on 0300 123 1100 or register a complaint with HMRC.

Acas (Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service) provides free, confidential and impartial information and advice to employers and employees on all aspects of workplace relations and employment law. The helpline has a free translation service for over 100 languages and can be called on 0300 123 1100.

You can ask Acas about:

  • Employment rights and responsibilities
  • Pay and the National Minimum and Living Wage

Find out more information about Acas.

If HMRC investigates your employer and concludes that the National Minimum or Living Wage has not been paid to a worker or group of workers, it will issue a Notice of Underpayment to that employer which sets out the arrears to be paid to the workers together with a penalty imposed on the employer. The employer may also be publicly named.

Arrears paid to workers can go back a number of years, are paid at the higher current National Minimum or Living Wage rates and your employer will have to pay the correct rates going forward. You don’t still have to be working for the employer in question to make a complaint. If you make a complaint and wish to remain anonymous, HMRC can hide your identity from an employer during any investigation.

HMRC will keep you updated on progress of any investigation.

When HMRC investigates an individual worker complaint, it is often the case that other workers in the same or similar situation end up being paid arrears too.

Are you an employer?

Are you an employer?

The National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage rates went up on 1 April 2018. Make sure you update your payroll so your employees get paid at least what they are legally entitled to.

National Living and Minimum Wage rates

Date 25 & over 21 to 24 18 to 20 Under 18 Apprentice
1 April 2017 £7.50 £7.05 £5.60 £4.05 £3.50
From 1 April 2018 £7.83 £7.38 £5.90 £4.20 £3.70

Apprentice rates

Date 25 & over

and completed the first year of apprenticeship

21 to 24

and completed the first year of apprenticeship

19 to 20

and completed the first year of apprenticeship

Apprentice

In the first year of apprenticeship or under 19

1 April 2017 £7.50 £7.05 £5.60 £3.50
From 1 April 2018 £7.83 £7.38 £5.90 £3.70

If you’re not sure what rate you’re paying your employees, use our calculator to check.

You can call the Acas Helpline to get advice and support to ensure that you understand what you need to do to pay your employees correctly.

Even if you are paying your employees at or above the National Minimum or Living Wage, you could still be underpaying them. This can easily happen when an employer makes a mistake in calculating pay.

Some of the most common mistakes are listed below. Check whether any of them could apply to your staff. If you discover you have been paying your employees below the correct minimum wage, you must pay any arrears immediately.

If an employee receives tips at work, they cannot legally be counted towards their National Minimum or Living Wage entitlement, they must be paid on top. If tips are counted as part of their pay, and you rely on them to bring their pay up to the National Minimum or Living Wage, then you could be illegally underpaying your staff.

Further information is available on the employers’ National Minimum Wage page. Further information and advice is available through Acas online or by calling 0300 123 1100.

If your employee’s work involves travel between different assignments, and you don’t pay them for that time, you might be underpaying your staff. Additionally, if you do not cover any associated expenditure incurred by a worker while travelling between different assignments, then your employees may not be receiving what they are legally owed.

Further information is available on the employers’ National Minimum Wage page. Further information and advice is available through Acas online or by calling 0300 123 1100.

If your employees are being paid a higher hourly rate for overtime or working anti-social hours, and being paid below the National Minimum or Living Wage for their regular shifts, then you could be illegally underpaying them.

Further information is available on the employers’ National Minimum Wage page. Further information and advice is available through Acas online or by calling 0300 123 1100.

If you have deducted your employee’s wages to cover the cost of items connected with their job such as uniform, safety clothing, specified work wear or tools etc. then you may have been underpaying them. Deductions for items connected with the job must not take a worker below the National Minimum or Living Wage for any given pay period.

Further information is available on the employers’ National Minimum Wage page. Further information and advice is available through Acas online or by calling 0300 123 1100.

If your employees work a little unpaid extra time on a regular basis, such as helping to open up shop or having to wait in the workplace before going home after a shift, you could be illegally underpaying them. Additionally, if you have not been paying them for time spent training or whilst on a trial period, then they may not be getting what they are legally owed. If you do this regularly, this unpaid time can quickly add up and you might find that you are failing to pay the National Minimum or Living Wage.

Further information is available on the employers’ National Minimum Wage page. Further information and advice is available through Acas online or by calling 0300 123 1100.

Age affects the rate an employee should be paid on the National Minimum or Living Wage. If you didn’t review your employee’s pay on their birthdays, you may not have been paying them correctly.

These are the current rates as well as the rates that will apply from 1 April 2018.

 

Date 25 & over 21 to 24 18 to 20 Under 18 Apprentice
1 April 2017 £7.50 £7.05 £5.60 £4.05 £3.50
From 1 April 2018 £7.83 £7.38 £5.90 £4.20 £3.70

 

Further information is available on the employers’ National Minimum Wage page. Further information and advice is available through Acas online or by calling 0300 123 1100.